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“Theory Becoming Alive”: The Learning Transition Process of Newly Graduated Nurses in Canada

Nour, V. and Williams, A.M. (2018) “Theory Becoming Alive”: The Learning Transition Process of Newly Graduated Nurses in Canada. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research, 51 (1).

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0844562118771832
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Abstract

Background
Newly graduated nurses often encounter a gap between theory and practice in clinical settings. Although this has been the focus of considerable research, little is known about the learning transition process.

Purpose
The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of newly graduated nurses in acute healthcare settings within Canada. This study was conducted to gain a greater understanding of the experiences and challenges faced by graduates.

Methods
Grounded theory method was utilized with a sample of 14 registered nurses who were employed in acute-care settings. Data were collected using in-depth interviews. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze data.

Results
Findings revealed a core category, “Theory Becoming Alive,” and four supporting categories: Entry into Practice, Immersion, Committing, and Evolving. Theory Becoming Alive described the process of new graduate nurses’ clinical learning experiences as well as the challenges that they encountered in clinical settings after graduating.

Conclusions
This research provides a greater understanding of learning process of new graduate nurses in Canada. It highlights the importance of providing supportive environments to assist new graduate nurses to develop confidence as independent registered nurses in clinical areas. Future research directions as well as supportive educational strategies are described.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Copyright: © 2018 SAGE Publications
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41709
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