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Regional differences in the feeding of the ambush predator Neosebastes pandus and comparisons of diets in the Scorpaenidae, Triglidae and Platycephalidae

Greenwell, C.N., Coulson, P.G., Tweedley, J.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-2749-1060 and Loneragan, N.R. (2018) Regional differences in the feeding of the ambush predator Neosebastes pandus and comparisons of diets in the Scorpaenidae, Triglidae and Platycephalidae. Journal of Fish Biology, 93 (1). pp. 95-109.

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1111/jfb.13677
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Abstract

This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the dietary composition of the ambush predator Neosebastes pandus and compares the diets of 49 species from 39 studies of three benthic predatory families in the Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae (20 species), Triglidae (19 species) and Platycephalidae (10 species). A total of 275 N. pandus were collected from the west (Rottnest Island) and south coasts (Esperance) of south‐western Australia and the percentage frequency and volumetric contribution of the stomach contents identified. Fish from the west coast consumed a greater mean number of broad taxonomic groups and were more diverse in their diet than fish from the south coast. Cephalopods, brachyurans and teleosts were the largest overall contributors to diet, with teleosts being more important to diets of west‐coast fish and polychaetes for south‐coast fish. This reflects differences in habitat between the two locations. Dietary composition also changed with increasing body size, reflecting morphological changes that allow bigger fish to capture and ingest larger, more mobile prey. Meta‐analysis of the diets of 49 species of scorpaenid, triglid and platycephalid revealed that they feed predominantly on teleosts and large crustaceans. Significant differences in diet were detected among families, with platycephalids being the most distinct and feeding more on teleosts than scorpaenids and triglids.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2018 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41646
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