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The detection and enhancement of latent fingerprints present on the adhesive side of black or dark coloured adhesive tapes

Ya, Adelaide (2018) The detection and enhancement of latent fingerprints present on the adhesive side of black or dark coloured adhesive tapes. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Duct tapes and other similar adhesive tapes are often encountered in various types of crime scenes and these range from homicides involving tape-bound bodies to construction of improvised explosive devices. Therefore, the ability to obtain quality fingerprint impressions that may be present from the adhesive side of tapes can yield critical investigative information aiding in the investigation process. The process of recovering the latent fingerprints on the adhesive side of tapes, however, can be problematic due to the nature of the adhesive surface.

It has been observed that there are a number of techniques that have been researched and proven to be able to develop quality latent fingerprint located on the adhesive side of tapes and cyanoacrylate fuming was one of them. However, the use of post-treatment fluorescent dyes has been considered as a potential risk to the health of frequent users. Therefore, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate those techniques available to better understand how the use of a one-step cyanoacrylate fuming technique might be an alternative and superior technique. In addition, as the research on utilising of a one-step cyanoacrylate fuming method has not been done on adhesive surfaces previously, this literature review provides an additional supporting reason for the present proposed research to evaluate the effectiveness of the method in retrieving latent fingerprints.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Supervisor(s): Coumbaros, John
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41443
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