Catalog Home Page

Heroism and the human experience: Foreword to the special issue

Franco, Z.E. and Efthimiou, O. (2018) Heroism and the human experience: Foreword to the special issue. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 58 (4). pp. 371-381.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0022167818772201
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Provenance has always been important to me. Knowing who has handled a set of ideas, and how those ideas were shaped, helps us as scholars to understand the intentions given to those ideas and how best to apply them in future work. Heroism’s relationship to humanistic and existential psychology is not a modern one. Humanistic/existential approaches have their grounding in virtue, based on the ideas of the ancient Greeks; likewise, the word hero itself is Greek, and the ideal of courage and physical perfection extend from the pre-Socratics (Kahn, 1992), to Aristotle and Plato (Hardie, 1978; Kendrick, 2010), to modern philosophy (Roudinesco, 2008). Over time, the meaning of hero changed from focusing on physical prowess and fame to the physical or social expression of virtue ethics. From this perspective, heroism can be seen as the embodiment of actions that hold us to the highest standard of caring for another, even against great personal costs (Franco, Efthimiou, & Zimbardo, 2016).

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Arts
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Copyright: © 2018 by SAGE Publications
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41200
Item Control Page Item Control Page