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Socio-technical systems analysis of waste to energy from municipal solid waste in developing economies: a case for Nigeria

Iyamu, H.O., Ho, G.ORCID: 0000-0001-9190-8812 and Anda, M.ORCID: 0000-0001-7398-4192 (2017) Socio-technical systems analysis of waste to energy from municipal solid waste in developing economies: a case for Nigeria. Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability, 2 (21). pp. 209-217.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1051/rees/2017027
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Abstract

Waste generation is an inevitable by-product of human activity, and it is on the rise due to rapid urbanisation, industrialisation, increased wealth and population. The composition of municipal solid waste (MSW) in developed and developing economies differ, especially with the organic fraction. Research shows that the food waste stream of MSW in developing countries is over 50%. The case study for this investigation, Nigeria, has minimal formal recycling or resource recovery programs. The average composition of waste from previous research in the country is between 50–70% putrescible and 30–50% non-putrescible, presenting significant resource recovery potential in composting and biogas production. Waste-to-energy (WtE) is an important waste management solution that has been successfully implemented and operated in most developed economies. This contribution reports the conditions that would be of interest before WtE potentials of MSW is harnessed, in an efficient waste management process in a developing economy like Nigeria. The investigation presents a set of socio-technical parameters and transition strategy model that would inform a productive MSW management and resource recovery, in which WtE can be part of the solution. This model will find application in the understanding of the interactions between the socio-economic, technical and environmental system, to promote sustainable resource recovery programs in developing economies, among which is WtE.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Environmental Technology Centre
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: EDP Sciences
Copyright: © H.O. Iyamu et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37604
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