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Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures: The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions

Locke, K.D., Church, A.T., Mastor, K.A., Curtis, G.J., Sadler, P., McDonald, K., Vargas-Flores, J.de J., Ibáñez-Reyes, J., Morio, H., Reyes, J.A.S., Cabrera, H.F., Mazuera Arias, R., Rincon, B.C., Albornoz Arias, N.C., Muñoz, A. and Ortiz, F.A. (2017) Cross-Situational Self-Consistency in Nine Cultures: The Importance of Separating Influences of Social Norms and Distinctive Dispositions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 43 (7). pp. 1033-1049.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167217704192
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Abstract

We assessed self-consistency (expressing similar traits in different situations) by having undergraduates in the United States (n = 230), Australia (n = 220), Canada (n = 240), Ecuador (n = 101), Mexico (n = 209), Venezuela (n = 209), Japan (n = 178), Malaysia (n = 254), and the Philippines (n = 241) report the traits they expressed in four different social situations. Self-consistency was positively associated with age, well-being, living in Latin America, and not living in Japan; however, each of these variables showed a unique pattern of associations with various psychologically distinct sources of raw self-consistency, including cross-situationally consistent social norms and injunctions. For example, low consistency between injunctive norms and trait expressions fully explained the low self-consistency in Japan. In accord with trait theory, after removing normative and injunctive sources of consistency, there remained robust distinctive noninjunctive self-consistency (reflecting individuating personality dispositions) in every country, including Japan. The results highlight how clarifying the determinants and implications of self-consistency requires differentiating its distinctive, injunctive, and noninjunctive components.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Sage
Copyright: © Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37274
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