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Effect of Australian sweet lupin (Lupinus angustifoliusL.) inclusion levels and enzyme supplementation on the performance, carcass composition and meat quality of grower/finisher pigs

Kim, J.C., Mullan, B.P., Nicholls, R.R. and Pluske, J.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-7194-2164 (2011) Effect of Australian sweet lupin (Lupinus angustifoliusL.) inclusion levels and enzyme supplementation on the performance, carcass composition and meat quality of grower/finisher pigs. Animal Production Science, 51 (1). pp. 37-43.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AN10087
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Abstract

Two hundred and twenty-four crossbred male pigs (Large White× Landrace, initial bodyweight 27.2 kg ± 0.22) were used to determine the influence of dietary Australian sweet lupin (ASL) inclusion level and enzyme supplementation on growth performance, carcass composition and meat quality. The experiment was a 4 × 2 factorial design with the respective factors being ASL inclusion level (Lupinus angustifolius L., cv. Mandelup; 200, 250, 300 and 350 g/kg, in replacement of soybean meal) and enzyme supplementation (without or with supplemental enzyme; Allzyme SSF). Pigs (7 pigs per pen × 4 replicates per treatment = 28 pigs per enzyme by lupin-level combination) were fed grower diets between 27 and 50 kg, finisher diets between 50 and 75 kg and pre-sale diets between 75 and 107 kg, and daily gain and feed intake were measured weekly. At ∼107 kg liveweight, the pigs were slaughtered at a commercial abattoir and carcass composition was measured. Meat quality (pH, surface exudate, drip loss, cooking loss, meat colour and shear force) was measured from selected pigs (n = 18) fed the lowest and highest lupin diets without enzyme supplementation. Increasing the ASL inclusion level to 350 g/kg did not alter (P > 0.05) growth performance of pigs and did not influence (P > 0.05) carcass composition and meat quality. Likewise, addition of supplemental enzyme had no effect (P > 0.05) on growth performance and carcass composition. Lack of performance response to added enzyme complex is likely due either to the use of enzyme complex that was not substrate-specific for the lupin non-starch polysaccharides or to the high specification of the experimental diets, which was inevitable when increasing inclusion levels of lupins. The results show that a current variety (Mandelup) of ASL can be used in grower/finisher diets up to 350 g/kg without compromising growth, carcass composition or meat quality of pigs.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Animal Research Institute
School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: (c) CSIRO
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3667
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