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Long-term viability of the northern anthracnose pathogen, Kabatiella caulivora, facilitates its transportation and spread

Barua, P., You, M.P., Bayliss, K.L.ORCID: 0000-0002-4431-3389, Lanoiselet, V. and Barbetti, M.J. (2017) Long-term viability of the northern anthracnose pathogen, Kabatiella caulivora, facilitates its transportation and spread. Plant Pathology, 66 (9). pp. 1463-1471.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppa.12704
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Abstract

The conidia and resting hyphae of the northern anthracnose pathogen of Trifolium species, Kabatiella caulivora, were effectively carried by, and maintained long-term viability on, a range of materials, including metals, fabrics, woods and plastics. Conidia and hyphae became thick-walled and melanized with time. There were significant (P < 0.001) differences in conidia/resting hyphae survival between carrier materials and between temperature regimes. At 23 °C/8 °C day/night, conidia and resting hyphae remained viable on steel, corrugated iron, galvanized steel, all tested fabrics, wood and random mixed materials for up to 8 months. At 36 °C/14 °C day/night, conidia and resting hyphae remained viable for up to 8 months, but only on cotton, denim, fleece, silk, leather, paper, plastic and all wood materials. At 45 °C/15 °C day/night, conidia and resting hyphae remained viable up to 8 months only on fleece wool, Eucalyptus marginata (jarrah wood) and paper. There were significant differences between carrier materials in their abilities to retain conidia and resting hyphae after washing (P < 0.001). Metabolic activity was confirmed for conidia and resting hyphae recovered after 8 months and K. caulivora colonies successfully re-established on potato dextrose agar. Findings confirmed the critical importance of materials as long-term carriers of viable K. caulivora conidia and resting hyphae, highlighting the potential for spread of a highly virulent K. caulivora race within and outside Australia via farming equipment, clothing and other associated materials. Results also have wider biosecurity implications for the transportation of fungal-infested carrier materials previously considered as low risk.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2017 British Society for Plant Pathology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36402
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