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A randomized controlled trial comparing autologous cranioplasty with custom-made titanium cranioplasty

Honeybul, S., Morrison, D.A., Ho, K.M., Lind, C.R.P. and Geelhoed, E. (2017) A randomized controlled trial comparing autologous cranioplasty with custom-made titanium cranioplasty. Journal of Neurosurgery, 126 (1). pp. 81-90.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.12.JNS152004
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE Autologous bone is usually used to reconstruct skull defects following decompressive surgery. However, it is associated with a high failure rate due to infection and resorption. The aim of this study was to see whether it would be cost-effective to use titanium as a primary reconstructive material.

METHODS Sixty-four patients were enrolled and randomized to receive either their own bone or a primary titanium cranioplasty. All surgical procedures were performed by the senior surgeon. Primary and secondary outcome measures were assessed at 1 year after cranioplasty.

RESULTS There were no primary infections in either arm of the trial. There was one secondary infection of a titanium cranioplasty that had replaced a resorbed autologous cranioplasty. In the titanium group, no patient was considered to have partial or complete cranioplasty failure at 12 months of follow-up (p = 0.002) and none needed revision (p = 0.053). There were 2 deaths unrelated to the cranioplasty, one in each arm of the trial. Among the 31 patients who had an autologous cranioplasty, 7 patients (22%) had complete resorption of the autologous bone such that it was deemed a complete failure. Partial or complete autologous bone resorption appeared to be more common among young patients than older patients (32 vs 45 years old, p = 0.013). The total cumulative cost between the 2 groups was not significantly different (mean difference A$3281, 95% CI $-9869 to $3308; p = 0.327).

CONCLUSIONS Primary titanium cranioplasty should be seriously considered for young patients who require reconstruction of the skull vault following decompressive craniectomy.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: American Association of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright: © AANS, 2017
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/35667
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