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Where there is a (collective) will, there are (effective) ways: integrating individual- and group-level factors in explaining humanitarian collective action

Thomas, E.F., McGarty, C., Reese, G., Berndsen, M. and Bliuc, A.M. (2016) Where there is a (collective) will, there are (effective) ways: integrating individual- and group-level factors in explaining humanitarian collective action. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42 (12). pp. 1678-1692.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167216669134
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Abstract

The 21st century has borne witness to catastrophic natural and human-induced tragedies. These disasters necessitate humanitarian responses; however, the individual and collective bases of support are not well understood. Drawing on Duncan’s motivational model of collective action, we focus on how individual differences position a person to adopt group memberships and develop a “group consciousness” that provides the basis for humanitarian action. Longitudinal mediation analyses involving supporters of international humanitarian action (N = 384) sampled annually for 3 years provided support for the hypothesized model, with some twists. The results revealed that within time point, a set of individual differences (together, the “pro-social orientation”) promoted a humanitarian group consciousness that, in turn, facilitated collective action. However, longitudinally, there was evidence that a more general pro-social orientation undermined subsequent identification with, and engagement in, the humanitarian cause. Results are discussed in terms of understanding the interplay between individual and group in collective actions.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Sage
Copyright: © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/34801
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