Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

The molecular epidemiology and evolution of the Panton–Valentine leukocidin-positive, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain USA300 in Western Australia

Monecke, S., Ehricht, R., Slickers, P., Tan, H-L and Coombs, G.ORCID: 0000-0003-1635-6506 (2009) The molecular epidemiology and evolution of the Panton–Valentine leukocidin-positive, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain USA300 in Western Australia. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 15 (8). pp. 770-776.

Free to read: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2009.02792.x
*No subscription required

Abstract

Between 2003 and 2008, 76 clinical isolates of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus strain 'West Australian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-12'(WA MRSA-12) were recovered from 72 patients living in the Perth area in Western Australia. These isolates were found to belong to multilocus sequence type 8, and had a USA300-like pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotype. All isolates were genotyped using diagnostic DNA arrays covering species markers, resistance factors, virulence-associated, as well as MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) genes to prove the identity between WA MRSA-12 and the pandemic strain USA300, as well as to detect possible genetic variability. In general, WA MRSA-12 isolates were similar to USA300, and the most common variant was identical to USA300- TC1516 . From this clone, most of the other variants may have evolved by a limited number of gene losses or acquisitions. Variations in carriage of virulence and resistance-associated genes allow distinction of variants or sub-clones. Altogether, 16 variants could be distinguished. They differed in the carriage of resistance genes (blaZ/I/R, ermC, msrA+mpbBM, aadD+mupR, aphA3+sat, tetK, qacC, merA/B/R/T) of β-haemolysin-converting phages and of enterotoxins (sek + seq, which were deleted in four isolates). Notably, the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) was absent in 12 isolates (15.8%). The mercury resistance (mer) operon, which is usually associated with SCC mec type III elements, was found in several ACME-negative isolates. The present study emphasises the importance of genotyping in detecting the introduction and evolution of significant MRSA strains within a community. © 2009 The Authors Journal compilation

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2009 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/31485
Item Control Page Item Control Page