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Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels

Govus, A.D., Peeling, P., Abbiss, C.R., Lawler, N.G., Swinkels, D.W., Laarakkers, C.M., Thompson, K.G., Peiffer, J.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-3331-1177, Gore, C.J. and Garvican-Lewis, L.A. (2017) Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 27 (7). pp. 704-713.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12685
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Abstract

The post-exercise hepcidin response during prolonged (>2 weeks) hypoxic exposure is not well understood. We compared plasma hepcidin levels 3 h after exercise [6 × 1000 m at 90% of maximal aerobic running velocity (vVO2max)] performed in normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (3000 m simulate altitude) 1 week before, and during 14 days of normobaric hypoxia [196.2 ± 25.6 h (median: 200.8 h; range: 154.3–234.8 h) at 3000 m simulated altitude] in 10 well-trained distance runners (six males, four females). Venous blood was also analyzed for hepcidin after 2 days of normobaric hypoxia. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) was measured via CO rebreathing 1 week before and after 14 days of hypoxia. Hepcidin was suppressed after 2 (Cohen's d = −2.3, 95% confidence interval: [−2.9, −1.6]) and 14 days of normobaric hypoxia (d = −1.6 [−2.6, −0.6]). Hepcidin increased from baseline, 3 h post-exercise in normoxia (d = 0.8 [0.2, 1.3]) and hypoxia (d = 0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), both before and after exposure (normoxia: d = 0.7 [0.3, 1.2]; hypoxia: d = 1.3 [0.4, 2.3]). In conclusion, 2 weeks of normobaric hypoxia suppressed resting hepcidin levels, but did not alter the post-exercise response in either normoxia or hypoxia, compared with the pre-exposure response.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/30977
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