Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Formal infectious diseases consultation is associated with decreased mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

Robinson, J.O., Pozzi - Langhi, S., Phillips, M., Pearson, J.C., Christiansen, K.J., Coombs, G.W.ORCID: 0000-0003-1635-6506 and Murray, R.J. (2012) Formal infectious diseases consultation is associated with decreased mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, 31 (9). pp. 2421-2428.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-012-1585-y
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

To determine the impact of infectious diseases consultation (IDC) in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. All MRSA bacteraemia and a random subset of MSSA bacteraemia were retrospectively analysed. Out of 599 SAB episodes, 162 (27%) were followed by an IDC. Patients with IDC were younger andmore frequently intravenous drug users, but fewer resided in a long-term care facility or were indigenous. Hospital length of stay was longer (29.5 vs 17 days, p<0.001), and endocarditis (19.1%vs 7.3%, p<0.001) and metastatic seeding (22.2% vs 10.1%, p<0.001) were more frequent in the IDC group; however, SAPS II scores were lower in the IDC group (27 vs 37, p<0.001). ICU admission rates in the two groups were similar. The isolate tested susceptible to empirical therapy more frequently in the IDC group (88.9%vs 78.0%, p00.003). Seven-day (3.1 vs 16.5%), 30-day (8.0%vs 27.0%) and 1-year mortality (22.2% vs 44.9%) were all lower in the IDC group (all p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that effective initial therapy was the only variable associated with the protective effect of IDC. In patients with SAB, all-cause mortality was significantly lower in patients who had an IDC, because of the higher proportion of patients receiving effective initial antibiotics.

Item Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © Springer-Verlag 2012.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29272
Item Control Page Item Control Page