Murdoch University Research Repository

Welcome to the Murdoch University Research Repository

The Murdoch University Research Repository is an open access digital collection of research
created by Murdoch University staff, researchers and postgraduate students.

Learn more

Effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise training on appetite regulation

Sim, A.Y., Wallman, K.E., Fairchild, T.J.ORCID: 0000-0002-3975-2213 and Guelfi, K.J. (2015) Effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise training on appetite regulation. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 47 (11). pp. 2441-2449.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (495kB)
Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0000000000000687
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Objective: An acute bout of high intensity intermittent exercise suppresses ad-libitum energy intake at the post-exercise meal. The present study examined the effects of 12 weeks of high intensity intermittent exercise training (HIIT) compared with moderate intensity continuous exercise training (MICT) on appetite regulation. Methods: Thirty overweight, inactive men (BMI: 27.2 +/- 1.3 kg/m2; V[spacing dot above]O2Peak: 35.3 +/- 5.3 mL.kg-1.min-1) were randomised to either HIIT or MICT (involving 12 weeks of training, 3 sessions per week) or a control group (CON) (n = 10 per group). Ad-libitum energy intake from a laboratory test meal was assessed following both a low-energy (LEP: 847 kJ) and a high-energy preload (HEP: 2438 kJ) pre and post-intervention. Perceived appetite and appetite-related blood variables were also measured. Results: There was no significant effect of the intervention period on energy intake at the test meal following the two different preloads (p >= 0.05). However, the 95% CI indicated a clinically meaningful decrease in energy intake after the HEP compared with LEP in response to HIIT (516 +/- 395 kJ decrease), but not for MICT or CON, suggesting improved appetite regulation. This was not associated with alterations in the perception of appetite or the circulating concentration of a number of appetite-related peptides or metabolites, although insulin sensitivity was enhanced with HIIT only (p = 0.003). Conclusion: HIIT appears to benefit appetite regulation in overweight men. The mechanisms for this remain to be elucidated.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology and Exercise Science
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Copyright: 2015 American College of Sports Medicine
Notes: Published ahead of print 18 April 2015
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/27366
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year