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A comparison of the effects of dietary spray-dried bovine colostrum and animal plasma on growth and intestinal histology in weaner pigs

King, M.R., Morel, P.C.H., Pluske, J.R.ORCID: 0000-0002-7194-2164 and Hendriks, W.H. (2008) A comparison of the effects of dietary spray-dried bovine colostrum and animal plasma on growth and intestinal histology in weaner pigs. Livestock Science, 119 (1-3). pp. 167-173.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2008.04.001
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Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary spray-dried bovine and porcine plasma and spray-dried bovine colostrum on growth performance and intestinal histology in weaner pigs. Thirty-two 21-day-old piglets (6.65 ± 0.14 kg) were allocated to receive one of four dietary treatments: control, bovine plasma, porcine plasma, and bovine colostrum at weaning and another 8 piglets were killed at weaning to provide baseline data. The experimental diets were offered ad libitum for one week, after which animals were killed and post-mortem measurements obtained. No differences in average daily feed intake and growth rate were observed among dietary treatment groups (P > 0.05). Baseline piglets had taller villi and shallower crypts (P < 0.05) in the proximal jejunum, mid jejunum and distal ileum than those observed a week after weaning, irrespective of dietary treatment. Weaning-related expansion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte populations was observed (P < 0.05). Complex and variable treatment effects on villus height, crypt depth, villus and crypt goblet cell density, and lamina propria T cell density were observed, suggesting that the tested protein sources do not share a common or simple mode of action.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2008 Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2700
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