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Nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing woody host influences on the growth of the root hemi-parasite Santalum album L.

Radomiljac, A.M. and McComb, J.A. (1998) Nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing woody host influences on the growth of the root hemi-parasite Santalum album L. In: A.M. Radomiljac, H.S. Ananthapadmanabho, R.M. Welboum and K. Satyanarayana Rao, 1998. Sandal and Its Products. Proceedings of an International Seminar, 18 - 19 December, Bangalore, India pp. 54-57.

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Abstract

The growth responses of S. album grown with nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing woody hosts as single plant pairings in large nursery containers were compared over time at Kununurra, Western Australia. S. album growth was greater, and the root:shoot ratio lower, when it was attached to three nitrogen-fixing woody hosts (Sesbania Formosa, Acacia trachycarpa, and A. ampliceps) compared with both unattached S. album seedlings and S. album grown with Eucalyptus camaldulensis. S. album shoot dry-weight increment per unit dry-weight of host shoot was greatest when attached to S. formosa. The growth of parasitised hosts was lower than that of unparasitised hosts. For Santa/urn, host quality is the single most important silvicultural component influencing early growth. Therefore, heartwood yield may be dependent on host species associated with Santalum.

Item Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Publisher: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)
Copyright: © Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/24247
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