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Curcumin for the treatment of major depression: A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study

Lopresti, A.L.ORCID: 0000-0002-6409-7839, Maes, M., Maker, G.L.ORCID: 0000-0003-1666-9377, Hood, S.D. and Drummond, P.D.ORCID: 0000-0002-3711-8737 (2014) Curcumin for the treatment of major depression: A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 167 . pp. 368-375.

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2014.06.001
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Abstract

Background
Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid derived from the spice turmeric, influences several biological mechanisms associated with major depression, namely those associated with monoaminergic activity, immune-inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and neuroprogression. We hypothesised that curcumin would be effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in individuals with major depressive disorder.

Methods
In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 56 individuals with major depressive disorder were treated with curcumin (500 mg twice daily) or placebo for 8 weeks. The primary measure was the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-rated version (IDS-SR30). Secondary outcomes included IDS-SR30 factor scores and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI).

Results
From baseline to week 4, both curcumin and placebo were associated with improvements in IDS-SR30 total score and most secondary outcome measures. From weeks 4 to 8, curcumin was significantly more effective than placebo in improving several mood-related symptoms, demonstrated by a significant group x time interaction for IDS-SR30 total score (F1, 53=4.22, p=.045) and IDS-SR30 mood score (F1, 53=6.51, p=.014), and a non-significant trend for STAI trait score (F1, 48=2.86, p=.097). Greater efficacy from curcumin treatment was identified in a subgroup of individuals with atypical depression.

Conclusions
Partial support is provided for the antidepressant effects of curcumin in people with major depressive disorder, evidenced by benefits occurring 4 to 8 weeks after treatment.

Limitations
Investigations with larger sample sizes, over extended treatment periods, and with varying curcumin dosages are required.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation(s): School of Psychology and Exercise Science
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: Elsevier
Notes: Available online 11 June 2014
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/23170
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