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Identification and characterization of fast- and slow-growing root nodule bacteria from South-Western Australian soils able to nodulate Acacia saligna

Marsudi, N.D.S., Glenn, A.R. and Dilworth, M.J. (1999) Identification and characterization of fast- and slow-growing root nodule bacteria from South-Western Australian soils able to nodulate Acacia saligna. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 31 (9). pp. 1229-1238.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0038-0717(99)00032-2
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Abstract

A total of 133 root nodule bacterial strains were isolated from nodules of Acacia saligna growing in soils from nine geographically separate locations in South-Western Australia; 40 were characterized on the basis of their growth and physiology and 20 by 16 S rRNA sequence analysis. Thirty-nine strains were fast-growing rhizobia, and 94 slow-growing bradyrhizobia. The latter were essentially acid-tolerant, alkali-sensitive and salt-sensitive, while the former varied in acid-tolerance and were alkali- and salt-tolerant. In addition many of the rhizobia grew at 37C whereas few of the bradyrhizobia could. The fastgrowing strains utilized disaccharides whereas the slow-growing bradyrhizobia did not. Using PCR a 260-264 bp segment of the 16 S rRNA gene was amplified and then sequenced. The fast-growing rhizobia can be divided into at least two groups - one showing similarity to Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli and the other to R. tropici. The slow-growers showed relationships to either Bradyrhizobium japonicum or Bradyrhizobium spp. (Lupinus).

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Rhizobium Studies
School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Elsevier BV
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/17708
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