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Coimmunisation with type I IFN genes enhances protective immunity against cytomegalovirus and myocarditis in gB DNA-vaccinated mice

Cull, V.S., Broomfield, S., Bartlett, E.J., Brekalo, N.L. and James, C.M. (2002) Coimmunisation with type I IFN genes enhances protective immunity against cytomegalovirus and myocarditis in gB DNA-vaccinated mice. Gene Therapy, 9 (20). pp. 1369-1378.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.gt.3301809
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Abstract

Viral DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein B (gB) of cytomegalovirus provide partial protective immunity upon challenge with infectious virus. Although it is known that type I IFN can stimulate the adaptive immune response, their direct use in vaccines has been limited. Here we show that coimmunisation of type I IFN and gB CMV DNA constructs enhances protective immunity in mice. In vivo expression of IFN transgenes ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 × 104 IU/g tibialis anterior muscle. Viral titre in major target organs and the severity of acute CMV-induced myocarditis was reduced preferentially with either IFN-alpha 9 or IFN-beta, but not with IFN-alpha 6, coimmunisation. However, all IFN subtypes investigated markedly reduced chronic myocarditis in gB-vaccinated mice. The early antiviral IgG1 and IgG2a titres were enhanced with IFN-beta coimmunisation. TNF and IL-10 was increased in response to MCMV infection in mice coimmunised with IFN subtypes and viral gB DNA. Indeed T cells from IFN-inoculated mice reduced myocarditis upon in vivo transfer. These results suggest that select type I IFNs may act as a natural adjuvant for the immune response against CMV infection. Type I IFN DNA coimmunisation may provide increased efficacy for viral vaccines and subsequently modulate post-viral chronic inflammatory disorders.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16789
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