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Cognitive-experiential self theory and conflict-handling styles: Rational and constructive experiential systems are related to the integrating and compromising conflict-handling styles

Cerni, T., Curtis, G.J. and Colmar, S.H. (2012) Cognitive-experiential self theory and conflict-handling styles: Rational and constructive experiential systems are related to the integrating and compromising conflict-handling styles. International Journal of Conflict Management, 23 (4). pp. 362-381.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/10444061211267263
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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how the rational and experiential systems according to the cognitive-experiential self theory (CEST) are related to conflict-handling styles. Design/methodology/approach: Using a correlational design, data were collected using an on-line survey system examining CEST information-processing systems and five conflict-handling styles. A total of 426 undergraduate students, with paid jobs, complete the on-line survey. Findings: Results showed that the rational system, experiential system and constructive thinking had significant positive relationships with both the integrating and compromising conflict-handling styles. Additionally, the rational system had a positive relationship with the dominating conflict-handling style and the experiential system and constructive thinking had a positive relationship with the obliging conflict-handling style. The rational system and constructive thinking had a negative relationship with the avoiding conflict-handling style. Research limitations/implications: The study established a positive connection between CEST information-processing systems and conflict-handling styles among undergraduate students, however the results of the study may not be as directly comparable with real and established leaders. Originality/value: Being the first study to examine the connection between the CEST information-processing systems and the five conflict-handling styles, the paper offers interesting insights about how the choice of information-processing systems can influence the choice of conflict-handling styles across a wide range of situations.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Copyright: © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/11019
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