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Cognitive behaviour therapy versus eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for post-traumatic disorder–is it all in the homework then?

Ho, M.S.K. and Lee, C.W. (2012) Cognitive behaviour therapy versus eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for post-traumatic disorder–is it all in the homework then? Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée/European Review of Applied Psychology, 62 (4). pp. 253-260.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.erap.2012.08.001
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Abstract

Introduction: Treatment of choice for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is either eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) or trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy (TFCBT). Objective: The aim of the present meta-analysis was to determine whether there are any differences between these two treatments with respect to efficacy and efficiency in treating PTSD. Method: We performed a comprehensive literature search using several electronic search engines as well as manual searches of other review papers. Eight original studies involving 227 participants were identified in this manner. Results: There were no differences between EMDR and TFCBT on measures of PTSD. However, there was a significant advantage for EMDR over TFCBT in reducing depression (Hedge's g = 0.63). The analysis also indicated a difference in the prescribed homework between the treatments. Meta-regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between hours of homework and gains in depression and PTSD symptoms. Conclusion: These findings are discussed in terms of efficacy and cost-effectiveness and the use of homework in therapy.

Item Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier Masson SAS
Copyright: © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/10915
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