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Anaesthesia clinicians estimate blood pressure by feeling the radial pulse: A randomised, controlled trial

Clarke, B.R., Simes, D.C. and Mouchel, B. (2018) Anaesthesia clinicians estimate blood pressure by feeling the radial pulse: A randomised, controlled trial. Biostatistics and Biometrics, 5 (1).

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Free to read: https://doi.org/10.19080/BBOAJ.2018.05.555655
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Abstract

The trial assessed the accuracy of anaesthesia clinicians in estimating an anaesthetised patient’s systolic blood pressure (SBP) by feeling the radial pulse. To credit their accuracy to luck, skill or circumstance, the volunteer medical participants were sequentially randomized to one of four groups: one group given no help (control), the second allowed to feel the pulse, the third given pre- and peri-operative clinical information, the fourth given both. We set out to collect 60 estimates for each group (240 estimates). The accuracy of their estimations was assessed to clinical and statistical significance. Specific objectives were to determine whether palpation statistically improved estimation of SBP and whether it could be clinically useful. Irrespective of the level of training or self-confidence, the doctors in the study performed better statistically against controls and to within pre-determined clinical relevance ranges when they were allowed to palpate the radial pulse. The degree of accuracy was enhanced by giving pre- and peri-operative information to the extent that the participant clinicians were able to estimate the systolic blood pressure to within 30mmHg accuracy 96.7% of the time.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Publisher: Jupiter Publishers
UNSD Goals: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41404
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