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Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Knowledge, attitudes, experiences and practices of the Western Australian youth custodial workforce

Passmore, H.M., Mutch, R.C., Burns, S., Watkins, R., Carapetis, J., Hall, G. and Bower, C. (2018) Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Knowledge, attitudes, experiences and practices of the Western Australian youth custodial workforce. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 59 . pp. 44-52.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2018.05.008
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Abstract

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a condition caused by prenatal alcohol exposure and characterised by lifelong physical, behavioural and cognitive abnormalities. Primary disabilities, such as impairment in memory, attention, cognition, language, executive function, and adaptive function, can lead to young people with FASD becoming engaged with the justice system. Little is known about the extent of FASD in youth detention in Australia, or of the capacity custodial staff have to manage and support young people with FASD. In tandem with a study assessing the prevalence of FASD among youth in detention in Western Australia (WA), this study aims to establish the current knowledge, attitudes, experiences and practices regarding FASD and other neurodevelopmental impairments among youth custodial officers in order to develop training resources for this workforce.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Law
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/41137
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