Catalog Home Page

Resting-state fMRI study of brain activation using low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in rats

Seewoo, B.J., Feindel, K.W., Etherington, S.J. and Rodger, J. (2018) Resting-state fMRI study of brain activation using low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in rats. Scientific Reports, 8 (1).

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (3MB) | Preview
Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24951-6
*No subscription required

Abstract

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique used to treat many neuropsychiatric conditions. However, the mechanisms underlying its mode of action are still unclear. This is the first rodent study using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to examine low-intensity (LI) rTMS effects, in an effort to provide a direct means of comparison between rodent and human studies. Using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats, rs-fMRI data were acquired before and after control or LI-rTMS at 1 Hz, 10 Hz, continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) or biomimetic high-frequency stimulation (BHFS). Independent component analysis revealed LI-rTMS-induced changes in the resting-state networks (RSN): (i) in the somatosensory cortex, the synchrony of resting activity decreased ipsilaterally following 10 Hz and bilaterally following 1 Hz stimulation and BHFS, and increased ipsilaterally following cTBS; (ii) the motor cortex showed bilateral changes following 1 Hz and 10 Hz stimulation, a contralateral decrease in synchrony following BHFS, and an ipsilateral increase following cTBS; and (iii) hippocampal synchrony decreased ipsilaterally following 10 Hz, and bilaterally following 1 Hz stimulation and BHFS. The present findings demonstrate that LI-rTMS modulates functional links within the rat RSN with frequency-specific outcomes, and the observed changes are similar to those described in humans following rTMS.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/40949
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year