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LOCAL CENTRES POLICY: An analysis of the growing prominence of corporate retailing, the displacement of independent businesses and the implications for local centres

Angel, Gary (2007) LOCAL CENTRES POLICY: An analysis of the growing prominence of corporate retailing, the displacement of independent businesses and the implications for local centres. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Local centres contribute to the sustainability of cities. Recent planning blueprints for Australian cities emphasise the importance of local centres policy in reducing car use, creating local economic growth and providing equitable access to goods and services. Globalisation has brought with it the tendency for independent businesses to be displaced by corporate retailers. Local centres are affected by this trend as global players jockey for a share of local retail and a diverse range of small retailers is replaced by fewer and larger businesses that draw customers from regional rather than local catchments. The growth in new retailing models such as franchise stores and chain stores, together with the move to auto-oriented retail formats, has meant that independents struggle to compete with the low pricing strategies of large corporate retailers. Independent businesses add diversity, vitality, colour and resilience to centres and make a greater local economic impact than their chain store competitors. In Britain, there is concern about the effect on towns and villages of the loss of small shops and independent businesses. In the USA, growth in large format stand-alone super stores has raised the ire of communities as retail giants put the “mom and pops” out of business. Local communities can consider policy measures such as applying size caps to chain store developments so that the independent business sector is supported and can continue to provide vitality to local centres. This research may provide useful insights for communities and local governments wishing to address issues that relate to the balance between chain stores and independents in their local centres.

Publication Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy
Notes: Note to the author: If you would like to make your thesis openly available on Murdoch University Library's Research Repository, please contact: repository@murdoch.edu.au. Thank you
Supervisor: Johnstone, Allan
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/40829
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