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Utilizing GPS to track crime scene investigators within a crime scene and monitoring their fatigue

D'Souza, Veronica (2017) Utilizing GPS to track crime scene investigators within a crime scene and monitoring their fatigue. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Crime scene investigators (CSI’s) can work long hours in less than ideal conditions which may increase the chances of fatigue being experienced. By understanding the mental acuity required for the job it can be understood to further analyse how physiological signs of stress and fatigue can affect the CSI’s work. In understanding fatigue, examination to monitor, measure and manage is needed. Physiological parameters including heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature have been analysed to show some association with fatigue and stress (1-3). The examination of physiological parameters in association with fatigue and stress is applied to athletes and whether it can be applied in the crime scene setting. In crime scene investigation, there are specific procedures followed to ensure continuity and integrity from the crime scene to the courtroom. One important procedure is note taking of the crime scene, which includes an entry and exit log of personnel moving in and out of the scene (4). By introducing Global Positioning System (GPS) as a component to track individuals in a crime scene, this could potentially replace crime scene entry and exit logs if proven successful. GPS is a satellite navigation system developed by the US Department of Defence and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) developed by Russia, where both provide positioning, navigation and timing services (5). The experimental project is to establish if GPS devices can effectively track CSI’s in a crime scene environment, while measuring their physiological parameters to show signs of stress and fatigue.

Publication Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Supervisor: Chapman, Brendan
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/39833
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