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Overview of water treatment process in Sarawak using peat and ground water

Chang, Kuet Shian (2003) Overview of water treatment process in Sarawak using peat and ground water. Masters by Research thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Water is one of the more important natural resources of mankind, in its natural form contains impurity. The method used to treat water into potable form involves complex and diverse technologies, depending on the nature of water; the treatment can be simple filtration or complex involving chemicals and extensive infrastructure.

Surface water from peat source and ground water are harder to treat to potable standards compared to other water source. Peat water is characterized by high colour, low pH and turbidity with pungent smell while groundwater contains high manganese, iron and other volatile gases. This paper gives an overview of the State of Sarawak current treatment processes for peat and groundwater, investigates the treated water quality, and recommends improvements and enhancement of the current processes and practice based on emerging technologies. The data for the assessment are obtained form Public Works Departments records and the Public Health Section of the Ministry of Health, Malaysia.

The high residue aluminium of the treated water quality suggests that the current conventional processes cannot treat peat water efficiently and effectively. The recommendations for improvement and enhancement are divided into treatment plant operations, treatment processes, water quality monitoring and regionalization
of treatment plants.

The limitations are the reliability of the records and the year assessed is only 2000 and 2001. A number of future research projects are identified.

Publication Type: Thesis (Masters by Research)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Supervisor: Ho, Goen
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/39187
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