Catalog Home Page

Peri-operative third party red blood cell transfusion in renal transplantation and the risk of antibody-mediated rejection and graft loss

Fidler, S., Swaminathan, R., Lim, W., Ferrari, P., Witt, C., Christiansen, F.T., D'Orsogna, L.J. and Irish, A.B. (2013) Peri-operative third party red blood cell transfusion in renal transplantation and the risk of antibody-mediated rejection and graft loss. Transplant Immunology, 29 (1-4). pp. 22-27.

Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trim.2013.09.008
*No subscription required

Abstract

Historic red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) may induce anti-HLA antibody which, if donor specific (DSA), is associated with increased antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Whether post-operative RBCT influences this risk is unknown. We examined the RBCT history in 258 renal transplant recipients stratified according to prevalent recipient HLA antibody (DSA, Non-DSA or No Antibody). AMR occurred more frequently in patients who received RBCT both pre and post transplant compared with all other groups (Pre+Post-RBCT 21%, Pre-RBCT 4%, Post-RBCT 6%, No-RBCT 6%, HR 4.1 p=0.004). In the 63 patients who received Pre+Post-RBCT, 65% (13/20) with DSA developed AMR compared with 0/6 in the Non-DSA group and 2/37 (5%) in the No-Antibody group (HR 13.9 p<0.001). In patients who received No-RBCT, Pre-RBCT or Post-RBCT there was no difference in AMR between patients with DSA, Non-DSA or No-Antibody. Graft loss was independently associated with Pre+Post-RBCT (HR 6.5, p=0.001) AMR (HR 23.9 p<0.001) and Non-AMR (6.0 p=0.003) after adjusting for DSA and delayed graft function. Re-exposure to RBCT at the time of transplant is associated with increased AMR only in patients with preformed DSA, suggesting that RBCT provides additional allostimulation. Patients receiving Pre+Post-RBCT also had an increased risk of graft loss independently of AMR or DSA. Both pre and post procedural RBCT in renal transplantation is associated with modification of immunological risk and warrants additional study.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
Copyright: © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/38891
Item Control Page Item Control Page