Catalog Home Page

Awakening Saudi mathematics teachers to their traditional conception of teaching and learning: The prospect of metaphor as a tool for reconceptualising professional practice

Alsulami, N.M. and Taylor, P.C. (2012) Awakening Saudi mathematics teachers to their traditional conception of teaching and learning: The prospect of metaphor as a tool for reconceptualising professional practice. In: 7th International Conference on Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 4 - 7 November 2012, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

Abstract

Saudi pre-service mathematics teachers learn about innovative teaching approaches during their undergraduate study with the aim of improving their professional teaching practice when they enter the educational field as teachers. As a Saudi mathematics teacher and practitioner-researcher, I reflected critically on my teaching experience and came to realise that many of us are not practising what we learnt. It seems that we practise only the conventional (teacher-centred) approach to teaching and learning in our classrooms. To investigate this issue I designed a critical auto/ethnographic methodology with which to engage in critical reflexivity and to interview six of my fellow Saudi preservice colleagues who are now mathematics teachers. By exploring our thoughts about teaching and learning, I found that during pre-service training we held only a traditional conception of teaching and learning and that we were largely unaware of it. Today, this conventional conception continues to govern our everyday teaching performance in the mathematics classroom. Lack of conscious awareness of our conventional conception has contributed to us thinking and acting automatically in accordance with the traditional commonplace ideology of teaching and learning. As a consequence of this research, I propose a tool that could help make ‘visible’ and subject to critical examination Saudi pre-service teachers’ deep-seated conceptions of teaching and learning. The thinking tool of ‘metaphor’ can help to excavate our implicit pedagogies and perhaps also serve as a 'master switch' to change belief sets and teaching practices.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37965
Item Control Page Item Control Page