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Charting the coast: spatial planning for tourism using public participation GIS

Munro, J., Kobryn, H., Palmer, D., Bayley, S. and Moore, S.A. (2017) Charting the coast: spatial planning for tourism using public participation GIS. Current Issues in Tourism, In press .

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2017.1346589
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Abstract

Coastal tourism continues to experience sustained growth on a global scale, leading to concerns regarding socio-cultural, economic and environmental impacts. To-date, the explicit integration of tourism development with coastal management has lagged behind more traditional planning concerns, presenting an opportunity and challenge for managers. Spatial planning using public participation geographical information systems (PPGIS) offers one solution for integration that is cognisant of the centrality of place in tourism. PPGIS was used to document spatially explicit data on place values, activities and development preferences along the remote, Aboriginal-managed Port Smith (Purnturrpurnturr) coastline in Western Australia. The research was developed and implemented as a collaborative partnership between Aboriginal custodians and University researchers. Ninety-seven questionnaires containing participatory mapping were conducted with residents and visitors. The participatory mapping approach successfully identified areas of potential conflict and allows tourism planners and managers to implement spatial planning that explicitly recognises and accounts for visitor values and preferences. Tourism, as well as marine spatial planning, can be enhanced by a holistic approach that considers both tangible and intangible socio-spatial data. Such an approach is likely to foster a more nuanced appreciation of what is valued in the landscape, providing greater insights to support sustainable long-term planning.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Routledge
Copyright: © 2017 Informa UK Limited
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37786
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