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Validity of the Timed Up and Go Test as a Measure of Functional Mobility in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis

Sebastião, E., Sandroff, B.M., Learmonth, Y.C. and Motl, R.W. (2016) Validity of the Timed Up and Go Test as a Measure of Functional Mobility in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97 (7). pp. 1072-1077.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2015.12.031
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Abstract

Objective: To examine the validity of the timed Up and Go (TUG) test as a measure of functional mobility in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) by using a comprehensive framework based on construct validity (ie, convergent and divergent validity).

Design: Cross-sectional study.

Setting: Hospital setting.

Participants: Community-residing persons with MS (N=47).

Interventions: Not applicable.

Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures included the TUG test, timed 25-foot walk test, 6-minute walk test, Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument, posturography evaluation, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, Symbol Digits Modalities Test, Expanded Disability Status Scale, and the number of steps taken per day.

Results: The TUG test was strongly associated with other valid outcome measures of ambulatory mobility (Spearman rank correlation, rs=.71-.90) and disability status (rs=.80), moderately to strongly associated with balance confidence (rs=.66), and weakly associated with postural control (ie, balance) (rs=.31). The TUG test was moderately associated with cognitive processing speed (rs=.59), but not associated with other nonambulatory measures (ie, Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument-upper extremity function).

Conclusions: Our findings support the validity of the TUG test as a measure of functional mobility. This warrants its inclusion in patients' assessment alongside other valid measures of functional mobility in both clinical and research practice in persons with MS.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: W.B. Saunders Ltd
Copyright: © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37693
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