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The nutrition transition in Korea and Australia: Child growth, infant mortality and diabetes

Lee, M.K. (2014) The nutrition transition in Korea and Australia: Child growth, infant mortality and diabetes. Journal of Nutrition & Intermediary Metabolism, 1 . p. 39.

Free to read: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnim.2014.10.140
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Abstract

Background/Aims: To review the nutrition transition in the Republic of Korea and Australia and associations with diabetes prevalence

Methods: A systematic review of relevant literature

Results: In the past 50 years Korea has improved its health and nutrition indicators more rapidly than any other large country. Infant mortality declined from 350 at the beginning of the 20th century to 109 in 1950 and is currently 4.01 per 1,000 live births. The equivalent rates for Australia are 103, 24.5 and 4.3 per 1,000 live births respectively. Completed height of boys and girls in Korea has increased at rate of 1.1 cm/decade for boys and girls in Korea compared to Australia (0.7 and 0.1 cm). Life expectancy has increased in Korea from 52.4 years in 1960, to 79.6 years in 2012 (Australia 71 and 82.1 years). The rapid improvement in nutrition and the continuing momentum for growth has contributed to increasing rates of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes is now found in 9.0% of Korean adults compared to 7.2% of Australians.

Conclusions: Korea has had the most rapid improvement in nutrition and growth rates of any OECD country, but this is being accompanied by a rapid increase in obesity and diabetes.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37350
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