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Differences in the occurrence and epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Western Australia (2002 − 2012)

Ng-Hublin, J.S.Y., Combs, B., Reid, S.A. and Ryan, U. (2017) Differences in the occurrence and epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Western Australia (2002 − 2012). Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 53 . pp. 100-106.

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Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2017.05.018
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Abstract

Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrhoeal illness caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium. In Australia, very little is known about the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in Aboriginal peoples. The present study analysed long-term cryptosporidiosis patterns across Western Australia (WA) (2001 − 2012), combined with genotyping and subtyping data at the 18S and glycoprotein 60 (gp60) loci respectively. Comparison of cryptosporidiosis notifications between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in WA, revealed that notification rates among Aboriginal people were up to 50 times higher compared to non-Aboriginal people, highlighting the burden of the disease in this population. More than 90% of notifications were in Aboriginal children aged 00–04 years, who had a notification rate 20.5 times higher than non-Aboriginal children in the same age group. Cryptosporidium hominis was the predominant species infecting both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. However, Aboriginal people were mainly infected with the C. hominis IdA15G1 subtype, whereas non-Aboriginal people were predominantly infected with the IbA10G2 subtype. To control cryptosporidiosis in Aboriginal populations in Australia, effective health interventions/promotions need to be a priority for public health research and action.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2017 Elsevier B.V.
UNSD Goals: Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/37120
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