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A cogenerative inquiry using postcolonial theory to envisage culturally inclusive science education

Adams, J., Luitel, B.C., Afonso, E. and Taylor, P.C. (2008) A cogenerative inquiry using postcolonial theory to envisage culturally inclusive science education. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 3 (4). pp. 999-1019.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11422-008-9130-0
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Abstract

This forum constitutes a cogenerative inquiry using postcolonial theory drawn from the review paper by Zembylas and Avraamidou. Three teacher educators from African, Asian and Caribbean countries reflect on problems confronting their professional practices and consider the prospects of creating culturally inclusive science education. We learn that in Mozambique, Nepal and the Caribbean scientism patrols the borders of science education serving to exclude local epistemological beliefs and discourses and negating culturally contextualized teaching and learning. Despite the diverse cultural hybridities of these countries, science education is disconnected from the daily lives of the majority of their populations, serving inequitably the academic Western-oriented aspirations of an elite group who are “living hybridity but talking scientism.” The discussants explore their autobiographies to reveal core cultural values and beliefs grounded in their non-Western traditions and worldviews but which are in conflict with the Western Modern Worldview (WMW) and thus have no legitimate role in the standard school/college science classroom. They reflect on their hybrid cultural identities and reveal the interplay of multiple selves grounded in both the WMW and non-WMWs and existing in a dialectical tension of managed contradiction in a Third Space. They argue for dialectical logic to illuminate a Third Space wherein students of science education may be empowered to challenge hegemonies of cultural reproduction and examine reflexively their own identities, coming to recognize and reconcile their core cultural beliefs with those of Western modern science, thereby dissipating otherwise strongly delineated cultural borders.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright: © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36975
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