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Standards for cultural contextualization of interpretive research: A Melanesian case

Waldrip, B.G. and Taylor, P.C. (1999) Standards for cultural contextualization of interpretive research: A Melanesian case. International Journal of Science Education, 21 (3). pp. 249-260.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/095006999290688
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Abstract

This paper draws on the personal experiences of an 'outsider' (or Western-oriented) science teacher and science teacher educator who has lived in Melanesian countries for almost a decade. During a recent interpretive research study of the problematic relationship between the traditional worldviews of Melanesian villagers and the official school science views of young Melanesian people, Waldrip became increasingly aware of the importance of conducting culture-sensitive interpretive research. Mindful of the important role, of the outside researchers in providing essential information for the local contextualization of school science curricula, Waldrip proposes a number of culture-sensitive practices, based on Guba and Lincoln's [(1989) Fourth Generation Evaluation (Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications)] criteria of trustworthiness and authenticity, when working in Melanesian cultural contexts. These practices address issues of initial contact, ownership of knowledge, prolonged engagement, persistent observation, member checks, language and interview process.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36871
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