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The effect of culture on the learning of science in non‐western countries: The results of an integrated research review

Baker, D. and Taylor, P.C.S. (1995) The effect of culture on the learning of science in non‐western countries: The results of an integrated research review. International Journal of Science Education, 17 (6). pp. 695-704.

Link to Published Version: https://doi.org/10.1080/0950069950170602
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Abstract

An increasing number of researchers are investigating the effect of students’ prior knowledge and beliefs on their development of scientific concepts. Much of this research is taking place within the framework of constructivism, and is attracting the attention of science educators in non‐western countries. This integrative research review has been undertaken to help researchers and practitioners to identify issues for further investigation and reflection. The results suggest that ‘cosmetic’ attempts to nationalize western science curricula in non‐western countries are likely to prove ineffective because the problem, from the students’ perspective, is one of poor ‘fit’ between their world‐views, language meanings and prior beliefs and those inherent in the subject. A constructivist paradigm seems to offer good prospects for both understanding the problem and formulating learning strategies in science education which are better suited to non‐western cultures. Nevertheless, constructivist pedagogies imported from the West should be examined for their cultural appropriateness.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36864
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