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Non-puddled transplanting of rice reduces life cycle greenhouse gas emission

Alam, M.K., Bell, R.W. and Biswas, W.K. (2017) Non-puddled transplanting of rice reduces life cycle greenhouse gas emission. In: Haque ME, Bell RW, Vance WH (eds) Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conservation Agriculture for Smallholders (CASH-II), 14 - 16 February, Mymensingh, Bangladesh pp. 142-143.

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Abstract

Wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.) production contributes 55% of agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Hence, any new technology with the potential to reduce the GHG emissions from wetland rice could make a significant contribution to total global warming mitigation by agriculture. Incorporation of conservation agriculture (CA) in the rice–based triple cropping system in the EGP remains a challenge. Measures to reduce CH4 emissions from rice fields often lead to increased N2O emissions, and this trade–off between CH4 and N2O is a major hurdle in reducing global warming potential (GWP) of wetland rice. Ideal strategies would reduce emissions of both CH4 and N2O simultaneously. A novel solution to these constraints for rice production is non-puddled transplanting of rice. The recent development of NP of rice together with residue retention is suitable for CA. A life cycle assessment (LCA) analysis of the new NP rice production technology can estimate its potential contribution to GWP. The present study was carried out to: assess the GHG emissions for conventional puddling and NP with different levels of crop residue retention; determine the hotspots contributing significantly to the GHG emissions within the system boundaries by a LCA study, and identify the causes for the predominant GHG emissions during the pre– and on–farm stages of rice production.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
UNSD Goals: Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
Goal 13: Climate Action
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36842
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