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Horticultural loss generated by wholesalers: A case study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia

Ghosh, P.R., Fawcett, D., Perera, D., Sharma, S.B. and Poinern, G.E.J. (2017) Horticultural loss generated by wholesalers: A case study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia. Horticulturae, 3 (2). p. 34.

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Abstract

In today’s economic climate, businesses need to efficiently manage their finite resources to maintain long-term sustainable growth, productivity, and profits. However, food loss produces large unacceptable economic losses, environmental degradation, and impacts on humanity globally. Its cost in Australia is estimated to be around AUS$8 billion each year, but knowledge of its extent within the food value chain from farm to fork is very limited. The present study examines food loss by wholesalers. A survey questionnaire was prepared and distributed; 35 wholesalers and processors replied and their responses to 10 targeted questions on produce volumes, amounts handled, reasons for food loss, and innovations applied or being considered to reduce and utilize food loss were analyzed. Reported food loss was estimated to be 180 kg per week per primary wholesaler and 30 kg per secondary wholesaler, or around 286 tonnes per year. Participants ranked “over supply” and “no market demand” as the main causes for food loss. The study found that improving grading guidelines has the potential to significantly reduce food loss levels and improve profit margins.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Publisher: MDPI
UNSD Goals: Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36814
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