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Reaching beyond an online/offline divide: invoking the rhizome in higher education course design

Jones, A. and Bennett, R. (2016) Reaching beyond an online/offline divide: invoking the rhizome in higher education course design. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 26 (2). pp. 193-210.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1475939X.2016.1201527
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Abstract

In the rush to digitise aspects of higher education to cater to an increasingly diverse and wide-ranging university market, there is a concern that best-practice teaching and learning based on sound pedagogy may be left behind. This article addresses this concern by offering a conceptual reimagining of the learning space that reaches beyond a digital/non-digital divide. The authors' argument posits that imagining online and offline as different learning spaces confuses a necessary pedagogical correlation between learning delivery and learning objective that allows questions of digital (or non-digital) delivery primacy over questions of pedagogical quality. To reassert the significance of pedagogically driven course structure and design, the authors invoke Deleuze and Guattari's image of the non-hierarchical rhizome to deconstruct binary thinking and to recognise online and offline as elements of the same pedagogical space. They then use Wenger, White, and Smith's Digital Habitat metaphor to reimagine course design as the creation of context-sensitive learning habitats that cater to the differing needs of blended and online-only students, within a single pedagogical ecosystem.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for University Teaching and Learning
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Copyright: © 2016 Association for Information Technology in Teacher Education
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36666
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