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Global review of energy use in urban transport systems and its implications for urban transport and land-use policy

Kenworthy, J. and Laube, F.B. (1999) Global review of energy use in urban transport systems and its implications for urban transport and land-use policy. Transportation Quarterly, 53 (4). pp. 23-48.

Abstract

The use of energy in urban transport systems is a critical dimension in the sustainability of cities. And, as the 21st century approaches, more attention is being placed on this issue because of the problematic global outlook for traditional oil supplies, and the effect that the burning of fossil fuels has on greenhouse gas emissions. Automobile cities, such as those in the U.S., use 8 times more energy per capita in private passenger transport systems than in more public transport-oriented Asian cities. These patterns can be traced to population trends in metropolitan regions and the various transport factors that flow from low-density, mixed land-use cities such as those in Asia, especially Hong Kong. Energy-use patterns cannot be defined in terms of a city's wealth, as is often claimed. Public transport energy use per capita represents a tiny fraction of that in private transport, even where public transport plays the major role in a city's transport system. Public transport offers huge savings in energy use and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Some policy implications, in terms of urban land-use change and transport infrastructure priorities, can further reduce energy use in transport and offer cities other positive outcomes for livability and sustainability

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Institute for Science and Technology Policy
Publisher: Eno Transportation Foundation
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36594
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