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A multimodality approach to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections: the role of chlorhexidine-alcohol as a skin antiseptic before intravascular catheter insertion

Ho, K.M. (2015) A multimodality approach to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections: the role of chlorhexidine-alcohol as a skin antiseptic before intravascular catheter insertion. Annals of Translational Medicine, 3 (21). p. 337.

Free to read: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC46910...
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Abstract

Health care-associated infection is an increasing threat to patient safety. Over 400,000 patients in the intensive care units (ICUs) and 1.2 million patients outside the ICUs were affected by hospital care-associated infections, with >30,000 deaths attributed to hospital care-associated bloodstream infections in United States in 2002 (1). Intravascular catheters play a pivotal role in the management of both ICU and non-ICU patients, but inadequate infection control precautions in using these devices may lead to catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) resulting in prolonged hospital stay and excessive mortality (2). As such, having the best strategy to prevent CR-BSI has a potential huge benefit on both patient outcome and healthcare cost (3).

Most intravascular catheters used in the ICUs are non-cuffed and for short-term purposes, extraluminal catheter colonization derived from the cutaneous microflora is believed to be the main mechanistic cause of CR-BSI (4). With this pathogenic mechanism in mind, strategies achieving successful eradication of cutaneous bacteria, both before and after intravascular catheter insertion, would be expected to be effective in reducing CR-BSI. Consequently, the CLEAN trial assessing whether skin scrubbing, in combination with using either chlorhexidine-alcohol or povidone iodine-alcohol as skin antiseptic, is effective in reducing CR-BSI has paramount importance (5).

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: AME Publishing Company
Copyright: © 2015 Annals of Translational Medicine.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/36259
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