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Microcultural differences and perceived ethical problems: An international business perspective

Sarwono, S.S. and Armstrong, R.W. (2001) Microcultural differences and perceived ethical problems: An international business perspective. Journal of Business Ethics, 30 (1). pp. 41-56.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1006222023373
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Abstract

This study examines the importance of microcultural differences on perceived ethical problems. This study also sought to identify the relationship between perceived ethical problems and value orientations as shown in the Hunt and Vitell's (1993) General Theory of Marketing Ethics. The data was collected from 173 Javanese, 128 Batak, and 170 Indonesian-Chinese marketing managers in Indonesia. The results indicate that, (1) Religious Value Orientation is positively related to the perceived ethical problems scores, and (2) there are significant differences among the three ethnic microcultural groups relative to their perceived ethical problems scores. These results imply that acculturation training program for expatriates should include aspects of microcultures and ethical perceptions held by the local managers. The establishment of ethical corporate culture and formalised codes of conduct are recommended for future ethics training.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Murdoch Business School
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/35918
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