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Effective demand response management in a low voltage grid

Essarras, Mohammad (2016) Effective demand response management in a low voltage grid. Honours thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

This project investigates the application of demand response on a low voltage grid with a comparison between traditional and effective demand response strategies to minimise the voltage violations in a network. For the project, a low voltage grid was constructed using the DIgSILENT PowerFactory 15.2 power systems analysis software. The low voltage grid built represents a common low voltage Australian distribution grid. This was achieved by using standards, technical manuals, and literature related to Australian distribution networks. Six different scenarios were considered to examine the performance of demand response on the constructed grid. Only two scenarios required the use of demand response; the grid under peak loading condition and the grid under average loading condition with future PV penetration values. For the peak loading condition, the voltage limits were breached with a minimum bus voltage of 0.93 Vp.u. The traditional demand response strategy equally reduced the 22 loads in the network from a scaling factor of 1.00 to 0.839. This resulted in a total load reduction of 35.4 kW which equated to a 16.1% load reduction. The effective demand response strategy reduced only 4 loads by a total of 23.8kW which equated to a 10.8% reduction of the total load.

For the average load with future PV generation values condition, voltage limits were breached with a maximum bus voltage of 1.072 Vp.u. The traditional demand response strategy reduced the PV generation uniformly from a scaling factor of 1.00 to 0.874. This resulted in a total PV generation reduction of 27.72 kW which equated to 12.6% and was distributed between 22 PV systems. The effective demand response strategy reduced the PV production of 4 PV systems by a total reduction of 26.07kW which equated to 11.85 %. The results showed that using an effective demand response management with a direct load control strategy is a more efficient solution than using a traditional demand response strategy.

Publication Type: Thesis (Honours)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Supervisor: Shafuillah, GM
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/35816
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