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The effectiveness of selecting small bloodstains (<3mm) in the determination of the area of origin

Pugh, Ryan (2016) The effectiveness of selecting small bloodstains (<3mm) in the determination of the area of origin. Masters by Coursework thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Forensic science attempts to answer questions such as “who”, “what”, “when”, and “how” events and/or individuals are involved in accordance to an offence. The forensic examiner specialised in BPA attempts to answer the “how” in regards to bloodletting events. In violent circumstances the most prevalent physical evidence type found is bloodstains and bloodstain patterns. BPA attempts to reconstruct the series of physical events, including altercations, which created bloodstain patterns at a scene. By understanding the concepts which determine the shape of bloodstains as well as through the use of trigonometric equations that determine the 3D spatial origin from which bloodstain patterns were created, physical events can then be recreated.

This literature review converges the literature surrounding BPA from the widely accepted approach to investigating a scene from a BPA perspective, principles that are the basis of BPA, future techniques that may be implemented when investigating a scene, small bloodstains, factors that affect bloodstain formation and lastly a proposition for a research project focusing on the effectiveness of small bloodstains in area of origin determination. Building upon the foundation of knowledge as well as knowledge gained from experimentation within this area can enhance the accuracy of techniques currently in use by BPA specialists. Also, the formation of new techniques suited for small bloodstains and/or the creation of specialised technology that can utilise small bloodstains will create a paradigm shift in the genre of bloodstain analysis.

Publication Type: Thesis (Masters by Coursework)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Supervisor: Speers, James and Reynolds, Mark
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/35019
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