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The effect of intramedullary pin size and plate working length on plate strain in locking compression plate-rod constructs under axial load

Pearson, T., Glyde, M.R., Day, R.E. and Hosgood, G.L. (2016) The effect of intramedullary pin size and plate working length on plate strain in locking compression plate-rod constructs under axial load. Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology, 29 (6). pp. 451-458.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-16-01-0008
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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of intramedullary pin size and plate working length on plate strain in locking compression plate-rod constructs. Methods: A synthetic bone model with a 40 mm fracture gap was used. Locking compression plates with monocortical locking screws were tested with no pin (LCP-Mono) and intramedullary pins of 20% (LCPR-20), 30% (LCPR-30) and 40% (LCPR-40) of intramedullary diameter. Two screws per fragment modelled a long (8-hole) and short (4-hole) plate working length. Strain responses to axial compression were recorded at six regions of the plate via three-dimensional digital image correlation. Results: The addition of a pin of any size provided a significant decrease in plate strain. For the long working length, LCPR-30 and LCPR-40 had significantly lower strain than the LCPR-20, and plate strain was significantly higher adjacent to the screw closest to the fracture site. For the short working length, there was no significant difference in strain across any LCPR constructs or at any region of the plate. Plate strain was significantly lower for the short working length compared to the long working length for the LCP-Mono and LCPR-20 constructs, but not for the LCPR-30 and LCPR-40 constructs. Clinical significance: The increase in plate strain encountered with a long working length can be overcome by the use of a pin of 30–40% intramedullary diameter. Where placement of a large diameter pin is not possible, screws should be placed as close to the fracture gap as possible to minimize plate strain and distribute it more evenly over the plate.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Schattauer
Copyright: © Schattauer 2016.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/34931
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