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Canola, narrow-leafed lupin and wheat differ in growth response to low–moderate sodium on a potassium-deficient sandy soil

Ma, Q. and Bell, R. (2016) Canola, narrow-leafed lupin and wheat differ in growth response to low–moderate sodium on a potassium-deficient sandy soil. Crop and Pasture Science, 67 (11). pp. 1168-1178.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/CP16220
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Abstract

Although soil salinity and potassium (K) deficiency are widespread in agricultural lands, there is a paucity of knowledge about the interactive effects of sodium (Na) and K on the growth and yield of major grain crops. In pot experiments, we examined salt tolerance of canola (Brassica napus L.), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and crop K requirement under Na supply ranging from low to high. Plant growth and seed yield of all three crops were lower at 40mgK/kg than at 100mgK/kg soil. Although 100mgNa/kg (4dS/m in soil solution) had little effect on canola cv. Boomer and wheat cv. Wyalkatchem, the salt-Treated narrow-leafed lupin cv. Mandelup died at 47 days after sowing, regardless of amount of soil K. In low-K soils, canola with 100mgNa/kg and wheat with 50mgNa/kg did not show K-deficiency symptoms and produced greater seed yield than plants with nil Na addition. At 100mgK/kg, Na-induced reduction in growth and yield occurred only to plants with 200mgNa/kg. However, at 160mgK/kg, 200mgNa/kg did not have an adverse effect. In canola and wheat, shoot K concentration increased and shoot Na concentration decreased with increasing amount of soil K; however, high soil K did not reduce shoot Na concentration in narrow-leafed lupin. The study showed that narrow-leafed lupin was very susceptible to salinity, whereas canola and wheat plants were relatively salt-Tolerant. The stimulation of growth and yield in canola and wheat by low-moderate Na in low-K soils suggests partial K substitution by Na, and that adaptation of canola and wheat to salt-Affected soils can be enhanced by high K supply.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/34827
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