Catalog Home Page

Concentration-dependent effect of hypocalcaemia on mortality of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: A cohort study

Ho, K.M. and Leonard, A.D. (2011) Concentration-dependent effect of hypocalcaemia on mortality of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: A cohort study. Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 39 (1). pp. 46-54.

Abstract

Mortality of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion is high. Although hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy have been well described as important determinants of mortality in patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion, the risk factors and outcome associated with hypocalcaemia in these patients remain uncertain. This cohort study assessed the relationship between the lowest ionised calcium concentration during the 24-hour period of critical bleeding and the hospital mortality of 352 consecutive patients, while adjusting for diagnosis, acidosis, coagulation results, transfusion requirements and use of recombinant factor VIIa. Hypocalcaemia was common (mean concentrations 0.77 mmol/l, SD 0.19) and had a linear, concentration-dependent relationship with mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.25 per 0.1 mmol/l decrement, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 1.52; P=0.02). Hypocalcaemia accounted for 12.5% of the variability and was more important than the lowest fibrinogen concentrations (10.8%), acidosis (7.9%) and lowest platelet counts (7.7%) in predicting hospital mortality. The amount of fresh frozen plasma transfused (OR 1.09 per unit, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.17; P=0.02) and acidosis (OR 1.45 per 0.1 decrement, 95% CI: 1.19 to 1.72; P=0.01) were associated with the occurrence of severe hypocalcaemia (<0.8 mmol/l). In conclusion, ionised calcium concentrations had an inverse concentration-dependent relationship with mortality of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion. Both acidosis and the amount of fresh frozen plasma transfused were the main risk factors for severe hypocalcaemia. Further research is needed to determine whether preventing ionised hypocalcaemia can reduce mortality of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Publishers Website: http://www.aaic.net.au/Document/?D=20100733
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/34400
Item Control Page Item Control Page