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Cost-effectiveness of using recombinant activated factor VII as an off-label rescue treatment for critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion

Ho, K.M. and Litton, E. (2011) Cost-effectiveness of using recombinant activated factor VII as an off-label rescue treatment for critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion. Transfusion, 52 (8). pp. 1696-1702.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1537-2995.2011.03505.x
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Abstract

Background: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is widely used as an off-label rescue treatment for patients with nonhemophilic critical bleeding. Study Design and Methods: Using data from the intensive care unit, transfusion service, and death registry, the long-term survival after using rFVIIa and the associated cost per life-year gained in a consecutive cohort of patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion (10 red blood cell [RBC] units in 24 hr) were assessed. rFVIIa was only used as a lifesaving treatment when conventional measures had failed. Results: Of the 353 patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion, 81 (23%) required rFVIIa as a lifesaving rescue treatment. The patients requiring rFVIIa received a greater number of transfusions (number of units: RBCs, 18 vs. 12; fresh-frozen plasma, 16 vs. 10; platelets, 4 vs. 2; p < 0.001) and had a shorter survival time (24 months vs. 33 months; p = 0.002) than those who did not require rFVIIa. The total cost per life-year gained of massive transfusion and incremental cost of rFVIIa as a lifesaving treatment were US$1,148,000 (£711,760; 95% confidence interval [CI], US$825,000-US$1,471,000) and US$736,000 (£456,320; 95% CI, US$527,000-US$945,000), respectively. The incremental costs of rFVIIa increased with severity of illness and transfusion requirement and were greater than the usual acceptable cost-effective limit (<US$100,000 per life-year) for most patients with critical bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: As a lifesaving treatment for critical bleeding, the incremental cost of rFVIIa was high. Careful patient selection is critical to balance the potential benefits of rFVIIa in an individual patient against the cost to the community.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Wiley
Copyright: © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/33913
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