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It's official – Cryptosporidium is a gregarine: What are the implications for the water industry?

Ryan, U., Paparini, A., Monis, P. and Hijjawi, N. (2016) It's official – Cryptosporidium is a gregarine: What are the implications for the water industry? Water Research, 105 . pp. 305-313.

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Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2016.09.013
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Abstract

Parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium are a major cause of diarrhoea and ill-health in humans and animals and are frequent causes of waterborne outbreaks. Until recently, it was thought that Cryptosporidium was an obligate intracellular parasite that only replicated within a suitable host, and that faecally shed oocysts could survive in the environment but could not multiply. In light of extensive biological and molecular data, including the ability of Cryptosporidium to complete its life cycle in the absence of a host and the production of novel extracellular stages, Cryptosporidium has been formally transferred from the Coccidia, to a new subclass, Cryptogregaria, with gregarine parasites. In this review, we discuss the close relationship between Cryptosporidium and gregarines and discuss the implications for the water industry.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/33174
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