Catalog Home Page

Do soil microbes drive Acacia species invasion in non-native ranges in Australia?

Birnbaum, C. and Leishman, M.R. (2014) Do soil microbes drive Acacia species invasion in non-native ranges in Australia? In: Mucina, L.,Price, J.N. & Kalwij, J.M. (eds.), Biodiversity and vegetation: patterns, processes, conservation. 57th Annual Symposium of the International Association for Vegetation Science, 1 - 5 September, Perth, Western Australia.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (163kB) | Preview

Abstract

Australian acacias are one of the most notable invaders worldwide. Across Australian states, acacias became invasive or even naturalized after being introduced to ecosystems outside their natural distribution range. The relative importance of soil biota in their invasion success remains unknown, particularly that of rhizobial and fungal communities. We tested the Enemy Release Hypothesis and the Acquired Mutualism Hypothesis to disentangle the belowground invasion mechanisms that may have assisted in the invasion success of these acacias across Australia.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Kwongan Foundation, Perth, Australia
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/33013
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year